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Watch as Julian Voss-Andreae explores some of the worlds smallest molecules and turns them into large works of art. Producer – Vince Patton.

http://www.julianvossandreae.com

QUANTUM MAN

According to quantum physics, the world is fundamentally quite different than it seems. For example, matter can be demonstrated to have a wave-like quality associated with its motion. Quantum physics describes a moving object as consisting of waves oriented perpendicular to its direction of motion. Drawing inspiration from this aspect of nature, I created an image of a walking human as a quantum object. Made up of thin, vertically oriented steel sheets representing those waves, this sculpture is a metaphor for the counter-intuitive world of quantum physics. Symbolizing the dual nature of matter with the appearance of classical reality on the surface and cloudy quantum behavior underneath, the sculpture seems to be solid when seen from the front, but dissolves into almost nothing when seen from the side.

 

SPIN FAMILY (Bosons and Fermions), 2009

Series of five objects

Steel and silk; largest object 7” x 6” x 6” (18 cm x 15 cm x 15 cm)

Spin Family (Bosons and Fermions) playfully equates the two fundamental kinds of matter in the universe with the two human genders. Due to their difference in a quantum physical property called spin, fermions have a tendency to stay isolated whereas bosons tend to attract each other. Spin Family is a series of objects displaying the three-dimensional structure of the spin as it follows from the rules of quantum mechanics. A continuous silk thread representing the spin is woven in and out of tiny circular metal frames giving a diaphanous quality to the overall forms. The single, well-defined direction of the spin in classical physics expands in quantum physics into a continuum of possibilities.

From Lawrence Berkeley National Labs to Silicon Valley, researchers are manipulating particles at the atomic level, ushering in potential cures for cancer, clothes that don’t stain, and solar panels as thick as a sheet of paper.