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Category Archives: nutrition

Nourish and Nurture your body with Nature

chlorella

PURIFY. ALKALIZE. CLEANSE.

The superfoods in Barlean’s Greens are revered for supporting the purification and cleansing of vital organs, body tissues and blood.* Each serving of Barlean’s Greens provides an optimal proprietary blend of the most vitalizing plant-based ingredients.

Suggested Use: Put one heaping tablespoon (three teaspoons) in 8 oz. of pure water or juice of choice and simply stir. Barlean’s Greens mixes instantly and tastes great. This nutrient rich super food can be taken one to three times daily.

After opening, Barlean’s Greens is best stored in the refrigerator. Do not use if tamper proof seal is broken or removed.

Ingredients: BioGreen 15:1*, Organic Spirulina, Organic Flaxmeal, RiceX Rice Bran, Chlorella C. G. F., Sea Vegetables, Spinach, Parsley, Astragalus, Schizandra, Acerola cherry, Rosemary extract, Green Tea extract, Curcumin extract, Stevia, nzimes Digestive Enzyme blend.*

*Biogreen is a Triple Potency Concentrate.
*nzimes is a registered trademark of the National Enzyme Company.

Soy Nutrition… The Whole Soy Story

So, how much soy did Asians eat?

Not much, even though we, as a society have been led by expert mass marketing to think otherwise. Soy has never, ever been a food staple in Asian history. The exception was that the poor often used the soybean to fill their empty bellies during times of famine. Even then, the soybeans were prepared in such a way as to neutralize the natural and inherent soy toxins thus proving that even ancient Asians understood the soybean better than we do today.

To consume a serving of tofu and a couple of glasses of soy milk has become commonplace for many Americans. Soy is also touted as the original protein source for those perusing a vegetarian lifestyle.

This is absolutely in excess of the amount of soy that Asians consume. In native Asia, from where so much of this “research” is purported to have originated, a tablespoon or two of soy is simply used as a condiment. According to K. C. Chang, the editor of Food in Chinese Culture, the total caloric intake of soy in the Chinese diet during the 1930’s was only 1.5 percent as compared to 65 percent for pork products.

The huge concern about consuming large amounts of soy products lies in the mega dosing of isoflavones. If consumers follow the nutritional advice of Protein Technologies International (manufacturers of soy-isolated protein) their daily genistein intake (an isoflavin found in soy) could exceed 200 milligrams per day. It goes without saying this level of genistein intake should be avoided.

tofu-and-soy-products

Up until only two decades ago, soy was considered unfit to eat. By Asians, mind you! To see the hold soy products have on the USA marketplace is truly a miracle. Agricultural literature clearly depicts the soybean and its first and foremost use as a crop rotation plant used to fix nitrogen in the soil. Soybeans did not serve as any form of food until the advent of the Chow Dynasty. During this period, fermentation techniques brought us some of the soy edibles we see today, such as tempeh, soy sauce and natto. In the second century B.C., the Chinese discovered a porridge of cooked soybeans could be precipitated with calcium sulphate or magnesium sulphate (Plaster of Paris or Epsom salts) to make tofu. Sound healthy?

The Chinese did not eat unfermented soybeans as they did other legumes because the soybean contains large amounts of antinutrients (toxins). First among them is hemagglutinin, a clot promoting substance that makes red blood cells clump together. Soy is rich in enzyme inhibitors that block the action of much needed enzymes required to digest proteins. These inhibitors are not deactivated during cooking. They can cause gastric distress and chronic deficiencies in amino acid uptake. Protein inhibitors and hemagglutinin are scientifically proven to inhibit growth, as evidenced in studies of weanling rats that eventually failed to thrive.

Soy contains goitrogens, plant chemicals that inhibit thyroid function. And 99% percent of the soy we consume is genetically modified, otherwise known as GMO. Soy has one of the highest percentages of contamination by pesticides of any of our foods. Soy is rich in phytic acid, a chemical that blocks the uptake of essential minerals. Soy has the highest phytate levels of all the grains and legumes. The phytates have been found to be resistant even to long slow cooking in an effort to denature them. There exist hundreds of research articles on phytic acid and their effects, including binding with certain nutrients like iron to inhibit their absorption.

The marketing push for more soy products has been relentless and global. Public relations firms help convert research projects into newspaper articles and advertising copy. It has worked like a charm. Soy protein is now found in a majority of supermarket breads. Soy can be found blended in the regular old corn tortilla. Try to find a salad dressing in a health food store whose first ingredient is not soy oil. Advertising for a new soy enriched loaf from Allied Bakeries in Britain targets menopausal women seeking relief from hot flashes. It goes on and on.

For more information on the great soy misinformation please consult the well-written and respected book entitled The Whole Soy Story by Dr. Kaayla Daniel.

wholesoystory

About The Author:
Dr. Linda Posh MS SLP ND brings a fresh perspective to natural health and nutrition. She packs a solid educational background with degrees in organic chemistry, psychology and a Masters in Communication Sciences and Disorders. Visit www.Nutra-Resources.com for information.